Skip To Main Content

Logo Image

Logo Title

Engineering/Technology

 

WHAT IS PROJECT LEAD THE WAY?

The Project Lead The Way (PLTW) engineering program at Clarence High School is a six-course engineering technology program designed to help students explore engineering and technology related careers and to prepare them for two and four year college engineering or engineering technology degree programs. Each class is taught in a laboratory setting using state-of-the-art technology, equipment and software. Instruction is generally one-third theory and two-thirds application, sometimes involving mentors from industry and college. Class activities focus on problem solving, requiring students to work individually or in teams to generate solutions. Students have the opportunity to earn college credit in 5 of the 6 courses, offering a link between high school and college. Typically, students that enjoy math, science, problem solving, design and working with tools and machines will benefit from exploring at least part of the program, if not all of it.

Click https://www.pltw.org/our-programs/pltw-engineering to learn more about the Project Lead The Way engineering program

Student Benefits

  • Real-world problem-solving experiences.
  • Develop college and career readiness.
  • Learn through hands-on experience using equipment and technology used in today’s industry.
  • Build-in-demand skills in the areas of collaboration, teamwork and communication.
  • Opportunity for college credit at Rochester Institute of Technology.

Successful completion of 5 or 6 PLTW courses will earn students a PLTW certificate of completion, recognition in the graduation program and honor cords to wear at graduation. Students also have the opportunity to earn college credit from Rochester Institute of Technology in the following classes: IED, CIM, POE, CEA and DE.Visit
https://www.rit.edu/emcs/pltw/undergraduate-credit/students-and-parents
for more information.

Students who decide not to complete the PLTW sequence or don’t have room in their schedule can still take PLTW courses as long as the course prerequisites are met. We’ve had a number of students that wanted to learn more about careers in engineering later in their high school career and were able to take one, two, three or four of the six courses to help them discover if an engineering pathway is for them. It’s never too late to see if engineering is a future career for you.

 

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY SCHEDULING

Here’s a look at a typical Project Lead The Way engineering student schedule over four years at Clarence High School:

Project Lead The Way Course Guideline

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

PLTW - Introduction to Engineering Design (IED)*

PLTW - Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)

PLTW - Principles of Engineering (POE)

PLTW – Engineering Design and Development (EDD)

 

 

PLTW** – Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) or Digital Electronics (DE)

PLTW** – Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) or Digital Electronics (DE)

* Satisfies NYS Art/Music requirement required for graduation.

** Can be taken as a second PLTW course during the school year if room allows in the student schedule.

All Project Lead The Way courses are full-year, one credit courses.

POE, DE and CEA are typically taken during a student’s junior or senior year, but occasionally sophomores have taken the courses and done well.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY CURRICULUM

Introduction To Engineering Design/DDP

Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) develops students’ problem-solving skills, with emphasis on developing proficiency with 3-D CAD modeling software. Students will apply the engineering design process in an effort to design products in an efficient, detail-oriented manner. Students will have the opportunity to create products that utilize 3D printers, laser cutters and traditional wood and metal working tools. At the end of the course, students will take the Project Lead The Way End of Course Assessment. College credit to Rochester Institute of Technology can be earned based on the student’s class average and PLTW End of Course Assessment score. IED is based on the NY State Design and Drawing for Production curriculum.
A Project Lead The Way Curriculum Grades 9,10, 11, 12
Full year subject 1 unit of credit
School exam
*Course satisfies the Arts graduation requirement

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)

Manufactured items are part of everyday life, yet most students have not been introduced to the high-tech, innovative nature of modern manufacturing. This course illuminates the opportunities related to understanding manufacturing. At the same time, it teaches students about manufacturing processes, product design, robotics, and automation. The course builds upon the solid computer modeling skills developed in the Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) course. Using skills from IED, students use Autodesk Inventor and Computer Numerical Control (CNC) equipment to produce actual three-dimensional models of their designs. At the end of the course, students will take the Project Lead The Way End of Course Assessment that will count as a 4th marking period grade. College credit to Rochester Institute of Technology can be earned on this course based on the student class average and PLTW End of Course Assessment score.
A Project Lead The Way Curriculum Grade 10, 11, 12
Full year subject 1 unit of credit Final project
Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design

Principles of Engineering

Through problems that engage and challenge, students explore a broad range of engineering and engineering technology topics, including mechanisms, the strength of structures and materials, electricity, and automation. Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation. In addition, students explore engineering ethics and their consequences. Students considering this course should have a working knowledge of math and science concepts. At the end of the course, students will take the Project Lead The Way End of Course Assessment that will count as a 4th marking period grade. College credit to Rochester Institute of Technology can be earned on this course based on the student class average and PLTW End of Course Assessment score.
A Project Lead The Way Curriculum Grade 10, 11, 12
Full year subject 1 unit of credit School exam

Engineering Design and Development

This course is designed for the student who is interested in entering the engineering/technical field. Students apply their high school knowledge of math, science, and technology to solve real-life engineering problems while integrating engineering, manufacturing, and business skills. Students work in small group teams of two to four students. The student will research, design, build, test, redesign until the problem has been solved. Design problems involve a wide range of engineering challenges (e.g., medieval trebuchets, kites, rockets, water/air missiles, to name a few). Students must maintain a portfolio of their work, which readies them for any post-secondary program or career. The course is heavy into Excel, which the students will learn throughout the year.
A Project Lead The Way Curriculum Grade 12
Full year subject 1 unit of credit Final project
Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design and Principles of Engineering

Civil Engineering and Architecture

Civil Engineering and Architecture students learn through hands-on projects and activities the important aspects of building design, site design and development. Students apply math, science, and standard engineering practices to design both residential and commercial projects and document their work using 3D architecture design software (Autodesk Revit). This course provides an overview of the fields of civil engineering and architecture, while emphasizing the interrelationship and dependence of both fields on each other. At the end of the course, students will take the Project Lead The Way End of Course Assessment that will count as a 4th marking period grade. College credit to Rochester Institute of Technology can be earned on this course based on the student class average and PLTW End of Course Assessment score.
A Project Lead The Way Curriculum Grades 10, 11, 12
Full year subject 1 unit of credit Final project

Digital Electronics

Digital Electronics is a foundation course of applied digital logic, which can be found in every discipline of Engineering. This course provides a foundation for students who are interested in electrical engineering, electronics, or circuit design. Students study topics such as combinational and sequential logic and are exposed to circuit design tools used in industry, including logic gates, integrated circuits, and programmable logic devices. Students will design circuits that are found in real-world applications and export their designs to a Breadboard or an FPGA Board (Field-Programmable Gate Array.) Students are also introduced to micro-controllers using basic programming skills. At the end of the course, students will take the Project Lead The Way End of Course Assessment that will count as a 4th marking period grade. College credit to Rochester Institute of Technology can be earned on this course based on the student class average and PLTW End of Course Assessment score.
A Project Lead The Way Curriculum Grades 10, 11, 12
Full year subject 1 unit of credit
School Project, PTLW exam
Prerequisite: Currently taken or enrolled in Math Algebra 2/Trig

TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM  

Manufacturing Systems in Metal

In this systems course, students investigate the systems used in manufacturing and construction with metals, metal working tools, and industry standards. Hands-on problem solving laboratory experiences include: hot metal casting, forging, machine operations, sheet metal working, and welding. (MIG, and stick). These experiences expose students to a variety of processes and related careers. Laboratory activities include: the safe use of tools, machines, and other resources to: design products, process materials, organize for and produce manufactured products, and using manufacturing and construction techniques to build various products.
Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
School exam
 

Material Processing 
Wood, Metal, and Plastic

In this course, students investigate systems used to process various materials, including wood, metal, and plastic, in a laboratory setting. The importance of resources, materials, availability, tools, and equipment used, technical knowledge, and safety considerations are covered in this course. Hands-on problem solving laboratory experience includes: procuring materials, as well as processing methods such as: shearing, chip removal, forming, casting, compressing/stretching, fastening, joining, and finishing processes. These experiences expose students to a variety of processes and related careers. Laboratory activities include: the safe use of tools, machines, and other resources to design products, process materials, organizing to produce manufactured products, and using manufacturing and construction techniques to build various products.  
Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
School exam
 

Production Systems in Wood

In this course, students investigate the systems used to process natural wood resources into manufactured and constructed products. Hands-on problem solving laboratory experiences include: solid wood construction, machining, joinery, veneering, lamination, and finishing. These experiences expose students to a variety of processes and related careers. Laboratory activities include: the safe use of tools, machines, and other resources to: design products, process materials, organizing for and produce manufactured products, and using manufacturing and construction techniques to build various products.

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
School exam

Production Systems in Wood 2

This is an advanced course that further develops students' woodworking skills. Production Systems in Wood 2 is an in-depth and hands-on course dealing with the methods, tools, safety, materials, and careers associated with custom carpentry. Students will utilize advanced methods of processing, joining and forming, and incorporate them into the projects they design. Students will also explore the diverse physical properties of different types of woods and be exposed to their unique and diverse applications. Students will receive training on and experience safely operating high quality wood working tools and equipment. Students may be responsible for the purchase of some of their materials. 

Grade 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
School exam

Residential Structures

In this elective course, students investigate the materials, procedures, economics, and many systems used in the construction of residential dwellings and structures. Topics include: related careers, finances, supplies, tools, equipment, techniques, and safety considerations. Hands-on problem solving laboratory experiences include the safe use of tools and machines, construction of residential structure components, modeling, roofing, electrical wiring, plumbing, insulation, and installation of windows and doors. Students are involved in the development and construction of an actual structure. Construction techniques and principles used at the present time are stressed in this course.
Grade 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
School exam

Robotics I

Students will learn to identify and understand the mechanical and electronic systems and subsystems that comprise a robot. Basic engineering and mechanical concepts will be explored as students work in teams to design and build robots from VEX robotic kits. Autonomous robots will be designed and assembled in support of learning basic programming skills in a C-language-based format. Students enrolled in Robotics I will compete against other schools in robotics competitions.
Grade 9, 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
School exam