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Social Studies

Courses that meet a graduation requirement: 
 
Global History & Geography I Regents

In this course students are introduced to a chronological approach to world history. Certain global themes and concepts are examined such as geography, environment, diversity, belief systems, culture, political systems, economic systems, science, technology and interdependence. The focus is from the ancient world through the 1700’s.
Grade 9
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
School exam

 Global History & Geography II Regents

This course provides a snapshot of the world circa 1750. The course continues chronologically up to the present. Several concepts are woven throughout the course including industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, conflict, technology, and the interconnectedness of the world. While the course emphasizes the importance of historical and spatial thinking, all the social studies practices and standards are included in the study of global history and geography. A Regents final exam is given at the end of this course.
Grade 10
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
Regents exam

Advanced Placement
European History

In this course, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from approximately 1450 to the present regarding European affairs. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. AP European History is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college course of modern European history and gives students an opportunity to earn college credit. There are no prerequisites for AP European History, but students should be able to read a college-level textbook, write grammatically correct, complete sentences, and have an interest in learning about important historical developments that helped shape our modern world. This course is often used as an alternative to Global II History and Geography but is open to all non-freshmen students A substantial preparatory summer reading and writing assignment is required. All students are required to sit for the exam in May. Students must pay the exam fee by the November due date. Waivers can be arranged for students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch program.
Grades 10, 11, 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
A.P. exam ($99.00) and Regents exam grade 10

Advanced Placement
World History

In AP World History: Modern, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from 1200 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation.  This course is often used as an alternative to Global History & Geography II, as well as an elective that offers the opportunity to earn additional AP Credit.  This course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college course or university survey of modern world history.  Preparatory summer reading and writing are required. All students are required to sit for the exam in May. Students must pay the exam fee by the November due date. Waivers can be arranged for students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch program.
Grade 10, 11, 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
A.P. exam ($99.00) and Regents exam grade 10

 United States History & Government Regents

This course is designed to assure that students have a good knowledge of the American historical tradition and the values in which that tradition is rooted. Students completing the course have a background in the structure and function of government, as well as an understanding of the social, political, economic, and historical development of American society.
Grade 11
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
Regents exam

American Military History
Niagara University - HIS 274

This course examines American Military History from the colonial period to present through a social historical and cultural perspective. This focus on the "New Military History" specifically investigates whether there is an American Way of War. Topics to be explored include the study of battlefield experience and how soldiers cope with the environment of war. This course also explores the impact war has on society, especially the home front. Finally, this course explores the importance of leadership in the historical interpretation of war. Major American conflicts are investigated including the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Vietnam, and Desert Storm.  This course can be taken in place of United States History & Governments. Students are required to register for the course through Niagara University (NUSTEP).  Teachers will assist in the registration process at the beginning of the year. Waivers are available for students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch program.
Grade 11, 12 (Grade 12 elective)
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
Regents exam (juniors only needing US History credit)

Niagara University tuition ($225.00). Students will earn three Niagara University credit (3 credit hours) & transcript

Advanced Placement
United States History

This course is for motivated students who have demonstrated excellence in previous Social Studies courses. It is a survey course with extensive chronological coverage and readings on a broad variety of topics in fields of American history such as: economics history, cultural and intellectual history, social history and political constitutional and diplomatic history. Preparatory summer reading and writing are required. All students are required to sit for the exam in May. Students must pay the exam fee by the November due date. Waivers can be arranged for students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch program.
Grades 11, 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
A.P. exam ($99.00) and Regents exam grade 11
Prerequisite: two years of Social Studies
 

 
  Participation In Government/Economics

This course is designed to satisfy the Regents mandate for a one semester course in economics and a one semester course in practical government. The goal of the economics portion of the course is to provide students with the economic knowledge and skills that will enable them to function as economically literate citizens in our society. The government portion of the course emphasizes the interaction between citizens and government at all levels; local, state, and national. Students are encouraged to understand and participate in decisions and issues. 
Grade 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
School exam and project

Advanced Placement
United States Government And Politics

This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States political reality. The goal of the economics portion of the course is to provide students with the economics knowledge and skills that will enable them to function as economically literate citizens in our society. All students are required to sit for the exam in May. Students must pay the exam fee by the November due date. Waivers can be arranged for students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch program.
Grade 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
A.P. exam ($99.00) and School exam
Prerequisite: None, previous A.P. courses strongly recommended

SUPA Public Policy

Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy
Syracuse Univ. - PST 101

This senior elective is an introduction to the analysis of public policy. The course is designed to provide students with basic research, communication, and decision-making skills used in public policy analysis. In addition, students are required to read and analyze articles in The New York Times on local, state and international public policy issues. The course will develop a range of applied social science skills that will help the student make more informed choices as a citizen, worker, and consumer. This course can be taken in place of Participation In Government. The economics curriculum will be taught during the second semester. Grades are based on class participation and five short papers/projects. Students are required to register for the course through Syracuse University (SUPA).  Teachers will assist in the registration process at the beginning of the year. Information on financial assistance can be found here.
Grade 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
Syracuse University tuition ($345.00). Students will earn three Syracuse University credits

 

 Elective Courses

 Advanced Placement
Human Geography

This course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to analyze human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. All students are required to sit for the exam in May. Students must pay the exam fee by the November due date. Waivers can be arranged for students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch program.
Grades 10, 11, 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
A.P. exam ($99.00) and Final project

Advanced Placement
Macroeconomics

This course is designed to replicate the introductory economics course taught in a university setting. The course is designed to give students a thorough knowledge and understanding of economic principles that apply to the economy as a whole. As such, the course stresses the study of national income and price determination, economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. Since the course is based on the university model, Advanced Placement Macroeconomics requires far more effort and commitment than the typical high school course. All students are required to sit for the exam in May. Students must pay the exam fee by the November due date. Waivers can be arranged for students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch program.
Grade 10, 11, 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
A.P. exam ($99.00) and School exam
Prerequisite: None, previous A.P. courses strongly recommended

Advanced Placement
Psychology

This course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Topics include research methods, biology of the brain, conditioning, sensation, perception, consciousness, social psychology, abnormal psychology, and treatment of psychological disorders raduate. All students are required to sit for the exam in May. Students must pay the exam fee by the November due date. Waivers can be arranged for students enrolled in the free or reduced lunch program.
Grade 10, 11, 12
Full year subject
1 unit of credit
A.P. exam ($99.00) and Final Project
Prerequisite: None, Biology and ½ year Psychology course recommended
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Psychology

In this course, you will learn about a wide range of psychological concepts including the history of psychology, development, intelligence, emotions, motivation, dreaming and social behaviors, but most importantly, you will learn about yourself.
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
Final project

  Sociology

Sociology is a course that examines human interaction within the American culture. Students study a variety of topics including: the nature of the group, the development of culture, collective behavior, and the social processes of interaction. Optional topics include the areas of social institutions (religion, marriage, education) and/or social problems (prejudice, dehumanization, etc.)
Grades 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
Final project

SUPA Sociology

According to the American Sociological Association: “Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior.” This elective course, offered through Syracuse University’s Project Advance, is an analytic, skills-based introduction to sociology. In this course, you’ll look at human interaction in a wide range of situations, from the intimate family to the hostile mob; from organized crime to religious cults; and from the divisions of race, gender, and social class to the shared beliefs of a common culture. The course also includes a brief introduction to social science research methods and offers students the opportunity to practice some research skills over the course of the semester. Students’ understanding of the material covered in this class will be evaluated through: individual and group projects, classroom presentations, and assignments that encourage students to learn and apply research skills. 
Grades 11, 12
1 semester subject
1/2 unit of credit
Syracuse University tuition ($345.00). Students will earn three Syracuse University credits

The Civil War Era

This course explores the major themes of the Civil War era including the causes of the war, major battles and events during the war, and the consequences following the war. Students participate in discussions, role-playing, multimedia presentations, and historical research including extensive use of electronic and web resources. The goal of this course is to help students develop a greater appreciation of the Civil War in an exciting atmosphere using film, music, primary sources and literature.
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
School exam or Final Project

The History And Psychology of The Holocaust

This course is designed to provide an in-depth look into Nazi Germany. Topics studied include; Hitler’s rise to power, the personalities of his top men, events leading to the Holocaust, resistance movements and the Nuremberg Trials.
Grades 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit
School exam

Western New York History and Geography

Western New York History and Geography will be a skills-based course that prepares students for regular U.S. History, Military History, P.S.T. 101, AP Geography, AP Government, AP U.S. History and AP World history classes. The course will emphasize historical thinking skills, spatial thinking skills, and the foundations of U.S. government and politics. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources, creating narrative representations of important events and exploring the multiple forces that produce change over time. They will acquire and practice spatial thinking skills, gain significant experience reading and creating different types of maps, and contemplate the significant role that geography and space play in shaping human identity. Students will also study the elements of political participation and are introduced to the functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 10, 11, 12
1 semester subject
½ unit of credit